Projection Bulbs

Where can I buy a bulb?

The Photo/Image News Network doesn't sell anything, but the editor also owns a camera store that sells bulbs and ships them throughout the world. Chris' Camera Center  phone # 803 641-0501

Why are there so many?

For many years, it seemed as though the projector manufacturers insisted on a brand-new bulb for every machine, with the result that there are literally hundreds of different bulbs. As specialty dealers, we have to help our customers get the right one

Projection bulbs are differentiated by several characteristics:

  1. type and shape of the base
  2. size of the envelope (glass)
  3. shape and location of the filament
  4. voltage
  5. wattage

GE's master guide would let you identify a bulb this way, but there's a simpler way. Since the 1950s, bulbs have been identified by a standard three-letter code, such as DEK, FHS, or ELH. 

Every bulb with a three-letter code is totally interchangeable with any other bulb with the same code, regardless of whether the manufacturer is GE, Sylvania, WIKO or someone else. Two bulbs of the same code will have the same voltage, wattage, base and filament orientation. It is possible that the glass envelope may look a little different, but that shouldn't matter.

If the customer knows the three letter code, it's easy to find a bulb for him. If not, you may have to play "20 Questions."

When you know the make and model of the projector, look in the General Electric guide. Bulbman has just published an excellent new guide as well.  If not, trying these questions will help you get the right bulb about 95% of the time:

  • What brand is the projector?
  • About how old is it?
  • Does the bulb look more like:

    A radio tube?
    A radar reflector?
    A pregnant spaceman?
    A glass peanut with 2 wires coming out the bottom?


Slide Projectors

First question: Is it a Kodak Carousel slide projector (does the round tray lie on top and go around horizontally, like a merry-go-round?)

  • If the bulb looks more like a radio tube, it's a DEK.
  • If it looks like a radio tube but has a white ceramic top, it's a CBA (but you can use a less expensive DEK)
  • If it looks like a radar reflector, and the projector has an "H" in its name (600-H, 760-H, etc) it uses an ELH (can also use ENH or ENG).
  • If it looks like a radar reflector and the projector is recent, with a model number in the 4000s or 5000s, it uses an FHS bulb.

Is it a Sawyers/Nikkormat/Miranda/Ansco slide projector?

(A clue, but not complete: does the round tray go vertically, like a ferris wheel?) chances are it uses a DAK/DAY/DAT). Some expensive models used the EGH instead, but will still take the DAK.

Vivitar and Hanimex projectors use the same trays, but use the FCS bulb instead. Ask "Does it use a bulb like a glass peanut with two wires sticking out the end?" These relatively inexpensive bulbs do not have a built-in reflector.

Is it a Bell & Howell Slide Cube projector?

  • If it looks like a radio tube but has a white ceramic top, it's a CBA (and you can't use a less expensive DEK)
  • If it looks like a radar reflector, it uses an ELH.

Old slide projectors that used Airequipt or TDC magazines often use the CLS or other single-contact bayonet bulb.

Is it a foreign slide projector?

(Agfa, Rollei, Bauer, Leica, Hanimex, Vivitar etc) Does it use a bulb like a glass peanut with two wires sticking out the end? These relatively inexpensive bulbs do not have a built-in reflector. This would make it an FCS or an FCR. Be careful - one is 12 volt, the other is 24 volt. FCR is 12V, 100W and FCS is 24V, 150Watts.

Most popular models: (if you don't find it here, there's a huge and slow-loading master list)

Airequipt 100, 300, 400, 600, 900 series DAY/DAK
Sprite 20 CWD
Argus PBB-300 CLS
Bausch & Lomb Balomatic 300 CWD, CAL
Balomatic 305, 500 DAY/DAK
Balomatic 605, 705 CZA, CAL
Balopticon 41-26-38 CEW, CDS
Bell & Howell Ringmaster slide/sound DDM
Robomatic CZX, CXY
Robomatic 750, 765A, 765A6 DDB, CZX
Headliner CLS, CMV
Slide Cube 956Q, 965Q CBA
Slide Cube 985, 986, 987, 991
CP40, RC50, RC55, RF60,
AF66, AR70, AF80, 1000, 3000
ELH, ENH
Eastman Kodak Carousel 5000, 5500 DEK
Carousel 550, 600, 650, 700, 750,  800, 850 DEK
Carousel 600H, 650H, 700H, 750H, 800H, 850H ELH, ENH
Carousel 4000, 4200, 4400, 4600, Medalist AF, 5200, 5400, 5600 FHS
Ektagraphic III AMT EXR
Ektagraphic III S-AV205 EHJ
Pocket Carousel 100, 200, 300 DDA
Carousel S, S-AV-1000 FCS
Leica Pradix BEH
Prado SM-300 CXK, CXY
Pradovit 153IR FCS
Pradolux BXT
Pradovit 253IR EHJ
Pradovit-Color, Autofocus 150 FCS
Pradovit TARC, R150, RA-150 FCS
Pradovit Color F DAT/DAK, DAY/DAK
Sawyers 710, 720 FCS
Crestline A, C, Deluxe, Special
R6, AF8
DAT/DAK, DAY/DAK
Crestline 501, 503, 505, 550s DAT/DAK, DAY/DAK
Grand Prix 570s DAY/DAK
Rotodisc 500XR, XM CRT
Rotomatic 600, 700, 707AQ,
717A, 727AQ, 737AQ
DAY/DAK, EGH
707Q, 707AQ (old) FBG/FBD
700AI, 747AQ, 747AQZ DYY/EGH
Sawyers 500 series DAT/DAK, DAY/DAK

Movie Projectors  

(if you don't find it here, there's a huge and slow-loading master list)

Most GAF or Ansco movie projectors use a DCH/DJA/DFP bulb.
Many European, and almost all Japanese silent movie projectors, use the CXR/CXL bulb, which is silver and shaped like "a pregnant sausage" or a "spaceman."

Airequipt 2100, 2200, 2300Z DCH/DHJ
2400z, 2500z ELE
Alpex 500 Duo CZX, CXY
American Research Lab Photo-Tronic 800 DCA, DEF
Ampro Corp A-8 CZX or DDB
Argus 356A, 357A DJL
Baskon 500, A1 DFA
Bauer
Bell & Howell Filmo 1620, 1620-Z DLE
Autoload 245, 248, 254R, 256 DFN/DFC
346, 356, 357, 456Z, 457, 458, 461, 462, 468, 476, 481 DJL
Bolex 18-5 CXR/CXL
18-5L *75W, 12V original bulb out of
production; there was
adapter for EFN
G8-16 (8&16mm) DDB, CZX
SM-8, SP-8, 18-3, SP-80 EFP
Multimatic EJA
Eastman Kodak 20 Universal, 25 CDS/CDX
50 CXK, CVS/CVX, CRS
Brownie 300 CMV
Brownie 500 CZX
Brownie 500 Model A-5, C CZA/CZB
Ektasound 235, 245 DFE
Instamatic M50, M60, M65 DFN/DFC
M68A, M77, M105, M109,M110 DFE
M68 DFN/DFK
M70, M80, M85 DNE
M90, M95, M100A DNF
Moviedeck ALL MODELS ELB, ENZ
Ektasound 265, 275, 285 ELB, ENZ
GAF (Ansco) Most models ending in "88" DCH/DJA/DFP
188Z DGB/DMD
1788Z EKP/ENA
2688Z, 2788Z ELE/ELT
Sound 2000S, 3000S, 3100S DNE

Photoflood Bulbs

Photoflood bulbs look like household incandescent bulbs. Because they burn at a higher temperature, they give much more light (and don't last as long.)
Photofloods are classified according to their size (wattage) and the color of light which they produce.
#1 photofloods use 250 watts of power.
#2 photofloods use 500 watts of power. They produce about twice as much light.
Standard (white) photofloods produce light with a color temperature of 3400 degrees. Color films "Type B" will produce the proper color without a filter.
Blue photofloods produce light which is 4800 degrees, close enough to daylight or blue flash to use as a fill-in light, particularly with color negative films.
3200 degree bulbs are used for some special purposes, with "Type A" film.

Photoflood reference chart:
  3200 degree 3400 degree 4800 degree
#1 (250 W) BAH (300W) BBA BCA
#2 (500 W) ECA EBV EBW

Enlarger Bulbs

Where can I buy a bulb?

The Photo/Image News Network doesn't sell anything, but the editor also owns a camera store that sells bulbs and ships them throughout the world. Chris' Camera Center  phone # 803 641-0501

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